Sunday, January 13, 2019

Tips to Help Prevent Glaucoma Vision Loss


10 Tips to Reduce Your Chance of Losing Vision from Glaucoma
Recent studies have identified a number of lifestyle factors that actually influence eye pressure which is a major risk factor for glaucoma. By either avoiding or embracing certain habits you can have a positive effect on your risk of glaucoma.

Get Regular Exercise. A recent study showed that people who engaged in moderate to vigorous physical activity appear to have a 73 percent lower risk of developing glaucoma. This is because blood flow and pressure inside the eye may change with exercise, which may affect glaucoma risk.

Eat a Diet Rich in Fruits & Green Leafy Vegetables. One study showed that people who ate more leafy vegetables have a 20 to 30 percent lower risk of developing glaucoma. Why? Nitrates in green vegetables can be converted to nitric oxide, which can improve blood flow and help regulate pressure inside the eye.

Drink Tea, BUT Coffee Only in Moderation. A recent study last month showed that people who consumed at least one cup of hot tea daily had 74 percent decreased odds of having glaucoma compared with those who did not consume hot tea. A little coffee is fine, but excessive caffeine intake is not ideal. One study found that drinking 5 or more cups of caffeinated coffee increased the risk of developing glaucoma. How can tea help? Antioxidants and the flavonoids contained in tea may improve the body’s ability to prevent the harmful effects of free radical damage.

Consider a Magnesium Dietary Supplement. We now know that an adequate intake of dietary magnesium may be beneficial for patients with glaucoma because of improved circulation.

Brush, Floss & See Your Dentist Regularly. A recent study showed that tooth loss may be linked to increased glaucoma risk due to because periodontal or gum disease stimulating and inflammatory response that can contribute to glaucoma.

Don’t SmokeStudies clearly show that smoking cigarettes increases the risk of glaucoma, and has an overall negative impact on eye health.

Maintain a Healthy Body WeightStudies show that people with a higher body mass index (BMI) are at increased risk for diabetes, and having diabetes puts people at risk of glaucoma. Having a too low BMI is also associated with increased glaucoma risk.

Avoid Inverted Yoga PositionsStudies show head-down positions can increase eye pressure and are not recommended for glaucoma patients.
Avoid NecktiesResearchers say that a too-tight necktie may increase the risk of glaucoma by increasing blood pressure inside the eyes.
  
Get Regular Eye Exams & Glaucoma Testing. Especially if you have a family history of the condition you are at greater risk and need more frequent eye exams and testingResearchers have recently identified certain genes that increase the risk of glaucoma. Those at higher risk of glaucoma include people of African descent, people with diabetes, and those with a family history of glaucoma. You are at greatly increased risk if you have a parent or brother or sister with glaucoma. 

If you or someone you know is concerned about their glaucoma risk and is considering making lifestyle changes, before making changes please be sure to schedule an eye exam at D’Ambrosio Eye Care at 800-325-3937, visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care, Google+ or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 865 Merriam Avenue, Suite 119, Leominster, Massachusetts 01453, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331, 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 and 255 Park Avenue, Suite 606, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609

Monday, January 7, 2019

Pterygia “Surfer’s Eye” & Melanoma Skin Cancer Risk


Does a Pterygium or "Surfer's Eye" Increase Melanoma Risk?  
A pterygium (pronounced “tuh-RIJ-ee-uhm”) is an elevated, wedged-shaped bump of tissue on your eyeball that starts on the sclera or white of your eye-most often on the side near your nose and can extend to the cornea. Although A pterygium is commonly referred to as "surfer's eye” because being around bright sunlight for long periods of time-particularly the harmful UV reflected light from water such as the ocean-can increase your risk. But there are other causes as well and you don't have to be a surfer or ever see the ocean to get a pterygium. Ultraviolet radiation from the sun appears to be the primary cause for the growth of pterygia but exposure to dust and wind along with dry eye disease are very common causes. Pterygia usually develop in 30- to 50-year-olds, and are rarely are found in children. If you have a light skin complexion and light eyes you have a greater chance of getting a pterygium.

Recently, researchers reporting in the British Journal of Ophthalmology reported the results of a study that considered whether people who had pterygia were at greater risk of melanoma skin cancer. They felt that since pterygia seemed to me more common in light skinned, light eyed people who were exposed to a lot of sunlight, that maybe they had greater melanoma skin cancer risk. They found that having a pterygium indicates a significantly increased risk of developing a melanoma of the skin and that eye care providers who see patients with developing pterygia should advise these patients of this increased risk and recommend regular skin surveillance with a dermatologist. Further, we know that if a pterygium becomes inflamed and affects the cornea, excision- pterygium surgery-may be necessary to avoid vision changes from corneal distortion or even scarring.

If you or someone you know has a pterygium please schedule an eye exam at D’Ambrosio Eye Care at 800-325-3937, visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care, Google+ or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 865 Merriam Avenue, Suite 119, Leominster, Massachusetts 01453, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331, 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 and 255 Park Avenue, Suite 606, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609.