Tuesday, April 22, 2014

iPad, Kindle & Nook May Help Glaucoma Patients

The vision loss from glaucoma can create difficulties for patients when it comes to reading. Adults with glaucoma read slower when reading silently for long periods of time and are more likely to have their reading speed decrease over time, possibly as a result of reading fatigue. The common technology of e-readers may offer some help in that patients with glaucoma may benefit from using e-readers such as iPads, Nooks and Kindle devices according to a recent study published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science. Fortunately, these studies suggest that iPads, Nooks and Kindle devices along with the apps that are developed for them may very well help glaucoma patients read more comfortably, over longer periods of time and with better overall ease.

If you or someone you know is concerned about vision loss from glaucoma and wishes to learn how e-readers like the iPad, Nook and Kindle might help are encouraged to schedule an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care is a leading eye and LASIK care practice with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 that serve the greater Boston and central Massachusetts.

Monday, April 14, 2014

Freedom after Lens Implant Surgery

I needed glasses mostly for reading.  I had a pair in every room in the house, in the car and at the office.  The worst part was forgetting glasses when I went shopping or to a restaurant.  I was totally non-functional without glasses. 

I felt fine before the surgery - not nervous at all. I was very excited about having my eyesight corrected. During the surgery, I felt totally comfortable.   I did not feel a thing and even chatted with everyone in the O.R. during the procedure!  Everyone at the surgical center in Gardner was wonderful. 

After the surgery I felt just a little strange for the first few hours that I needed to leave the band aid on my “surgery” eye.  Seeing double made me a little nauseous for the few hours after the band aid came off.  I just napped for a few hours and everything was fine after that.  I was able to read without glasses for the first time that same night!

Mostly my work has been affected because I had prescription glasses for my computer work and prescription glasses for regular reading.  I do a lot of both throughout my work day so it was frustrating before surgery.  Not anymore!!!  FREEDOM!  I can’t wait to see if it improves my golf game in the spring!!! 

The staff, at both Dr. D’Ambrosio’s office and the surgical center, was the best.  Total professionalism, compassion and understanding in all of the prep appointments, the day of surgery and my post op visits.  I would highly recommend every single person that I encountered throughout this procedure!


Catherine F. 

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

Use Proper Sports Eye Protection to Prevent Injury

D’Ambrosio Eye Care reminded patients of the need to use proper sports eye protection to prevent a range of potential eye injuries. Aprilis Sports Eye Safety Awareness Month and the American Academy of Ophthalmology asks eye doctors to remind our community that 40,000 people suffer from eye injuries related to sports every year.

“Sometimes athletes overlook the potential risks that so many sports create for eye injuries. These can be of a wide range of eye problems including abrasions of the cornea, bruises of the eyelids, retinal detachments and internal bleeding,” said Rachel Robbins, M.D., a Massachusetts Ophthalmologist. “Unfortunately some of the most serious risks involve permanent vision loss along with infection and can be catastrophic to not only vision, but to everyday functioning-lifelong,” she further explained.

What patients need to know is that 90 percent of serious eye injuries are preventable through use of appropriate protective eyewear. Make sure the level of eye protection you or others in your family use is appropriate for the type of activity. Regular eyeglasses do not offer proper eye protection. Athletes need to wear appropriate, sport-specific protective eyewear properly fitted by an eye care professional. Lenses made from polycarbonate materials provide the highest level of impact protection; they can withstand a ball or other projectile traveling at 90 miles per hour.

If you or someone you know has questions or would like help in selecting, fitting or choosing sports protective eyeglasses, please schedule an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio EyeCare or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care is a leading eye and LASIK care practice with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street,Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 that serve the greater Boston and central Massachusetts area.

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

Contact Lens Specialist on Dry Eyes, Contact Lenses & Birth Control Pills

Michael Fu, O.D.
Massachusetts Contact Lens Specialist
Massachusetts Optometrist and Contact Lens Specialist, Dr. Michael Fu posed the question for patients, “What does having dry eyes have to do with wearing contact lenses and birth control pills?” As it turns out there actually is a relationship between dry eye symptoms in woman using oral contraceptives who wear contact lenses. A study published in the journal Cornea examined the relationship among oral contraceptive pill (OCP) use, contact lens wear and dry eye signs and symptoms in healthy young women. As it turned out, there were no differences in dry eyes between the phases of the menstrual cycle and no evidence that tear osmolarity-or saltiness-was affected by OCP or contact lens use in the young women. However, the study found that the combination of OCP use and contact lens wear together may increase the severity of dry eye symptoms.

If you or someone you know is concerned about glaucoma risk or has any family history of glaucoma they are encouraged to schedule an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care is a leading eye and LASIK care practice with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street,Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 that serve the greater Boston and central Massachusetts area.

Monday, March 17, 2014

What is a Pterygium?


A pterygium is a fleshy growth which starts on the conjunctiva and grows across part of the cornea.  It typically develops in individuals who live in hot climates and spend a lot of time outdoors.  It likely represents a response to chronic dryness and ultraviolet exposure.  When a pterygium becomes red or irritated, eye drops or ointments may be used to help reduce the inflammation.  If these traditional treatments are not sufficient to reduce symptoms or if the pterygium is large enough to threaten sight, it can be removed by surgical excision.  After the pterygium is excised there is still a chance of regrowth.  To reduce the chance of regrowth there are several techniques that have been successful.  Conjunctival auto-grafting is a technique that uses tissue from a different part of the patient’s own eye to cover the area of the excised pterygium and amniotic membrane transplantation uses tissue acquired from the innermost layer of a human placenta.  In addition to these treatment options, recurrence rates can be further reduced by protecting the eyes from sunlight with the proper ultraviolet protection and using lubrication when exposed to dry conditions.


Tuesday, March 4, 2014

Help for Glaucoma with Micro Stents During Cataract Surgery

Massachusetts Cataract Surgeon Francis D’Ambrosio Jr., explained how patients with cataract and glaucoma can actually have their glaucoma treated during cataract surgery with tiny implantable micro stents. “In the U.S., over 20% of patients undergoing cataract surgery have a concurrent diagnosis of glaucoma, which represents approximately 700,000 patients each year,” explained Dr. D’Ambrosio Jr. “If you are being treated for glaucoma, have cataracts and might need cataract surgery there is an additional glaucoma treatment option called Microinvasive Glaucoma Surgery (MIGS) that utilizes tiny stents to help control the eye pressure or intraocular pressure,” he further explained. Most patients with glaucoma are treated with eye drops to lower their pressure, have laser treatments for glaucoma ad if necessary have surgery for glaucoma treatment. The problem with eye drops for glaucoma is that patient compliance is often not consistent and may be as low as 50% after the first year-thus additional treatment options such as laser treatment for glaucoma of MIGS might be a better way for some patients to keep their eye pressure under control.

If you or someone you know has cataracts and glaucoma and is considering cataract surgery, you might wish to learn more about Microinvasive glaucoma surgery with stents by scheduling an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care is a leading eye and LASIK care practice with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 that serve the greater Boston and central Massachusetts area.

Thursday, February 20, 2014

Macular Degeneration (AMD) Risk Taking Aspirin

“Your risk of developing age related macular degeneration (AMD) may increase by taking aspirin,” noted Massachusetts Retina Specialist Sreeni Basa, M.D.”Aspirin is a very useful medication. In fact aspirin is one of the most widely used over-the-counter medications, with an estimated 120 billion tablets taken each year for headaches, body aches and fever-and millions of people at high risk of heart attack due to atherosclerosis use daily aspirin therapy as a preventative measure, thanks to aspirin’s anticoagulant properties,” explained Dr. Basa.

In a study published in December 2012, researchers followed nearly 5,000 participants (aged 43 to 86 years) for more than 20 years. These participants, part of the Beaver Dam Eye Study, received eye examinations every five years. Results showed 512 cases of early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and 117 cases of late AMD over the course of the study.

Additionally, at each exam, participants were asked if they had regularly used aspirin at least twice a week for more than three months. Researchers found that regular aspirin use 10 years prior to eye examination was associated with late AMD, with estimated incidence of 1.76 percent, compared to 1.03 percent in non-aspirin users. Researchers concluded that these associations, though small, were statistically significant.

Interestingly, regular aspirin use 10 years prior to eye examination was significantly associated with the “wet” form of AMD, which accounts for 10 percent of all AMD cases, but is responsible for the majority of functional blindness attributed to the disease. An even more recent study published in January 2013 confirmed this aspirin/AMD link. In this study, researchers analyzed data from a 15-year Australian population-based cohort. At the beginning of the study, 2,389 participants completed a detailed questionnaire that assessed aspirin use, heart disease status and AMD risk factors. In addition, they received four eye examinations during the 15-year study period.

After analyzing data, 63 (out of 257) regular aspirin users developed wet AMD—an astounding 24.5 percent. Even after adjusting for other risk factors like age, sex, smoking, history of heart disease and body mass index, regular aspirin users still had a higher risk of developing wet AMD. Researchers concluded, “Regular aspirin use is associated with increased risk of incident neovascular [Wet] AMD, independent of history of cardiovascular disease and smoking.”

Alternatives to Aspirin
If you’re a regular aspirin user, you should get a thorough eye exam as soon as possible to determine your AMD status. This is extremely important because AMD often doesn’t show any symptoms until well after the condition has taken hold.

If you or someone you know is concerned about glaucoma risk or has any family history of glaucoma they are encouraged to schedule an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care is a leading eye and LASIK care practice with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 that serve the greater Boston and central Massachusetts area.