LASIK Boston Laser Cataract Surgery D’Ambrosio Eye Care Blog

Monday, July 6, 2020

Light Intelligent Lenses. What Are They?



Don’t be squinty outside. We offer photochromic lenses or light intelligent lenses. A popular brand you may recognize is Transitions® Brand. They offer so many solutions and their entire portfolio blocks 100% UV. They automatically adapt to changing light, Transitions® lenses darken when outdoors and return back to clear when indoors. They still have the original colors you may have seen but they now come in so many more colors. You can customize your look or compliment your frame color. There is also Transitions® XTRActive lenses. They get extra dark outdoors to protect your eyes from the brightest sun, even in the hottest conditions and darken behind the windshield to protect drivers’ eyes from sunlight. In addition to these popular solutions they offer technology in the top selling contact lens, Acuvue Oasys. It can be a lot of technology to know and understand so that is why they offer risk free shopping. If you try photochromic lenses and decide they are not for you within the time frame you can have your lenses remade without photochromic lenses and get the money you paid for this upgrade back. Come in to any of our locations and have our licensed Opticians help you create the new you.

Visit D’Ambrosio Optical Center to learn more FEATURE, or visit us at D’Ambrosio Optical Center, or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help select fashionable, comfortable and durable eyeglasses and eyewear for your entire family.

D'Ambrosio Optical Center provides personalized service fitting and selection of eyewear for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 865 Merriam Avenue, Suite 119, Leominster, Massachusetts 01453, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Monday, June 29, 2020

Visual Perception in Kids with Epilepsy


Brain surgery for epilepsy in kids is sometimes necessary to stop seizures and allow children to function. However, brain surgery carries significant risks, including impairment in visual perception. Normal visual function requires not just information sent from the eye, but also image and neurological processing in the brain that allows us to understand and act on that information, or perception. Signals from the eye are first processed in the early visual cortex, a region at the back of the brain that is necessary for sight. They then travel through other parts of the cerebral cortex, enabling recognition of patterns, faces, objects, scenes, and written words. In adults, even if their sight is still present, injury or removal of even a small area of the brain’s vision processing centers can lead to dramatic, permanent loss of perception, making them unable to recognize faces, locations, or to read, for example. But in children, who are still developing, this part of the brain appears able to rewire itself, a process known as plasticity.

According to a study funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), due to this neuroplasticity, children can keep full visual perception—the ability to process and understand visual information—after brain surgery for severe epilepsy. Plasticity is a sort of “rewiring” process that can occur in children because they are still developing.

If you, a friend, relative or acquaintance has a child who suffers from visual perception problems please schedule an eye exam at D’Ambrosio Eye Care at 800-325-3937, visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care, or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 865 Merriam Avenue, Suite 119, Leominster, Massachusetts 01453, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331, 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 and 255 Park Avenue, Suite 606, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609.

Monday, June 22, 2020

Glaucoma & Risk of Falling from Visual Field Damage




The visual field loss resulting from the progression of glaucoma can pose a risk of falling to patients. Falling and the fear of falling (FoF) is a significant risk to patients-especially seniors. Researchers were interested in finding out more about how and when patients with visual field damage from glaucoma were at risk of falling and thus reported on a study in the American Journal of Ophthalmology in which they investigated where glaucoma patients most often fall and how integrated visual field (IVF) damage affects falls rates per year (falls/year) and per step (falls/step) at and away from home.

Their research conclusions for this glaucoma population suggested that a) most falls occurred at home, b) the risk of any step resulting in a fall was higher at home and c) those with greater visual field damage were more likely to fall for each step taken both at and away from home. Based on this, it is important to consider making efforts such as home environmental modification to prevent falls while maintaining physical activity.

If you, a friend, relative or acquaintance suffers from glaucoma and is concerned about falling or fear of falling, please schedule an eye exam at D’Ambrosio Eye Care at 800-325-3937, visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care, or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 865 Merriam Avenue, Suite 119, Leominster, Massachusetts 01453, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331, 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 and 255 Park Avenue, Suite 606, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

How Common is Dry Eye Disease?


Dry eye disease (DED) is a multi-factorial ocular surface disease characterized by symptoms of dryness, grittiness, discomfort, irritation, and often visual disturbance. DED can create significant burdens on patients, including problems in social settings, occupational functioning, and reduced quality of life. Known risk factors for DED include female sex, increasing age, and certain systemic health conditions (i.e. autoimmune diseases), and a wide range of medications that are known to result in dry eyes. It is estimated that some 5% to 34% of individuals over 50 suffer from dry eyes depending on the definition of dry eye used to prepare the estimate.

For more information, visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care at 800-325-3937, D’Ambrosio Eye Care, or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 865 Merriam Avenue, Suite 119, Leominster, Massachusetts 01453, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331, 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440 and 255 Park Avenue, Suite 606, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609.

Friday, May 22, 2020

Masks: Why Are We All Wearing One?



We know that the primary way people get infected with COVID-19 is through respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets are released into the air when you sneeze, cough AND talk! The research tells us that face masks-even common cloth masks, surgical masks and non-fit-tested respirators, can be an effective barrier to spreading respiratory droplets. So…we are…and we ask you to…wear a mask please!

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision!
Should you need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 800-325-3937 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation  or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at D’Ambrosio Eye Care.

Visit us at D'Ambrosio Eye Care or on Facebook.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Practical Eye Health Tips for COVID


There are some practical eye health tips and precautions that you should consider to stay safe from COVID risk. We suggest thinking about:
  • If You Wear Contact Lenses, Consider Switching to Glasses for a While. There's no evidence that wearing contact lenses increases your risk of Coronavirus infection, but if you wear contacts, you tend to touch your eyes more than average. Wearing glasses decreases the likelihood and need to touch your eyes. 
  • Wearing Glasses May Add a Layer of Protection. Eyeglasses or sunglasses can shield your eyes from infected respiratory droplets in the air, but they don’t provide 100% security. The virus can still reach your eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms of your glasses. If you’re caring for a sick patient or potentially exposed person, safety goggles may offer a stronger defense. 
  • Stock Up on Eye Drops and Medicine Prescriptions If You Can. If possible try to stock up on critical medications and eye drops, so that you’ll have enough to get by if you are quarantined or if your pharmacy is unable to fill your refills. If your insurance allows you to get more than 1 month of essential eye medicine, such as glaucoma drops, you should do so. Some insurers will approve a 3-month supply of medication in times of natural disaster. Ask your pharmacist or our office for help if you have trouble getting approval from your insurance company. And as always, request a refill as soon as you’re due. Don’t wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy. 
  • Avoid Rubbing Your Eyes. Everyone rubs their eyes! We all do it and it can be a tough to stop. But-doing so will lower your risk of infection. If you feel an urge to itch or rub your eye or even to adjust your glasses, use a tissue instead of your fingers. Dry eyes can lead to more rubbing, so consider adding moisturizing drops to your eye routine. If you must touch your eyes for any reason-even to administer eye medicine-wash your hands first with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Then wash them again afterwards. 
We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 1-800-325-3937 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at D’Ambrosio Eye Care. Visit us at D'Ambrosio Eye Care or Facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare/.

Monday, May 4, 2020

COVID Eye Safety & Contact Lenses-What to Know!

COVID Eye Safety & Contact Lenses

The traditional “best practices” for wearing contact lenses safely may not be sufficient to completely prevent COVID-19 spread, as wearing contact lenses requires a great deal of finger manipulation around the eyelids, nose and mouth in order to insert the lenses. Contact lens wearers often touch their eyes, mouth and nose, putting wearers at risk for contracting the virus. Even with the best care and hygiene the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recently published recommendations for corona virus eye safety that strongly suggested not wearing contact lenses and keeping everything away from patients’ eyes. That said, you can choose to keep wearing your contact lenses but:

  1. Wash your hands carefully and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, followed by hand drying with unused paper towels. This should occur before every contact lens insertion and removal. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. People should avoid touching their face, including their eyes, nose and mouth, with unwashed hands.
  2. Disinfect or dispose your contact lenses as prescribed by your doctor. Either dispose of your daily disposable lenses each evening, or regularly disinfect your monthly and two-week lenses according to instructions.
  3. Discontinue lens wear if sick. Consistent with recommendations for other types of illness, those who feel ill with cold or flu-like symptoms should cease contact lens wear.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens, PLEASE CALL 800-325-3937 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at D’Ambrosio Eye Care. Visit us at D'Ambrosio Eye Care at our Eye Care Blog, or on Facebook.