LASIK Boston Laser Cataract Surgery D’Ambrosio Eye Care Blog

Monday, April 13, 2015

Ocular or Ophthalmic Migraine: Eye Headaches?

Studies indicate that between 10-20% of the U.S. population above the age of 18 suffers from severe headaches and probable migraine headaches. When most of us think of the word “migraine” we think that it is really just about headaches. At D’Ambrosio Eye Care, we sometimes hear from otherwise healthy patients, that about once or twice a month they see these strange pulsing images in both eyes-both with their eyes open and closed! Sometimes they tell us that they start out small, may last 10-20 minutes and even cause their vision to become blurry. These episodes actually describe what we know to be an Ocular Migraine-a migraine without a headache! What patients are experiencing is the aura that many sufferers have before the onset of a classic migraine headache. An ocular or ophthalmic migraine often includes zigzag lines, colored lights or flashes of lights expanding to one side of your vision over perhaps 10 to 30 minutes.

If you experience these symptoms, in order to be sure that this is not a sign of a more serious problem, you should consider scheduling an evaluation and eye exam with us so that we can rule out any other problems and work in concert with your primary care physician or a neurologist to make sure that other testing is not needed.

If you or someone you know is concerned about symptoms of migraine or eye headaches they are encouraged to schedule an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate evaluation and treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Cataract Night Vision Problem Story

We hear from patients all the time about night vision problems, and especially from seniors who are concerned about aging eye problems. Here is what a recent patient had to say:

“Driving after the onset of darkness was becoming troublesome. An eye examination revealed the reduced visibility was likely due to the clouded cataract in my left eye and surgery was indicated.

The pre-surgery staff was very professional and the procedures were performed in a careful and diligent manner.  I was monitored at all times by the staff and made very comfortable.  The surgical staff was very professional and kept me informed of the procedures.  The surgery was painless and took only several minutes to complete.

It took a few hours for the surgical related medication to dissipate and I was free of any surgery related symptoms later that day.  The post-surgery care was timely and all visits were completed in a professional manner.

My vision is improved and night driving is no longer a concern."

Richard B.

If you or someone you know is concerned about aging eye problems such as cataracts, especially if you are having night vision or driving problems, please have them contact D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help answer questions.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Sunday, April 5, 2015

UV & HEV Eye Protection

The threat posed by exposure to UV rays is well known to eye care professionals. We want to make sure our patients are well informed too! Even the US Environmental Protection Agency recommends we all wear sunglasses even when the UV index indicates you are at a low risk of exposure. UV radiation from exposure to these rays is cumulative. With this in mind it is especially important to protect a child with sunglasses as well. Their daily exposure tends to be even higher than adults because they spend a lot more time outside. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation 20% of our lifetime exposure to UV radiation is sustained during childhood. As patients, we would like for you to think of protecting your eyes and the delicate skin around your eyes from these harmful rays, when you go to put sunscreen on always remember that includes your sunglasses!

At D’Ambrosio Eye Care we offer sunglass frames from various designers as well as frames for your sporting needs. Our #1 selling non-glare for your everyday clear lenses is Crizal Avance UV™ having an E-SPF of 25 and our #1 selling non-glare for your sunglasses is Crizal Sunshield UV™ having an E-SPF of 50. Both are available with EyeMed benefits!

If you or someone you know is concerned about UV & HECV and want to be sure they are getting the best type of protective eyewear, schedule an eye examination at D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Eye Injury Risk from Laser Pointers

Laser pointers are very often used in classrooms, lecture halls, during presentations and even as toys. But did you know that laser pointers can be a potential source of eye injury? Specifically, the greater a laser pointer's output power, the more likely it will cause serious eye injuries. Having a better understanding of the “do’s & don’ts’ of laser pointers as well as the potential for eye injuries as related to their strength and power, can go a long way to making that laser pointer on your desk or in your child’s hand a safe and useful tool.

Laser Pointer Output Strength
As the power increases above five milliwatts, the time margin for safe exposure decreases and permanent eye and skin damage can occur quickly. However, the output power of laser pointers is not immediately apparent to the user. Laser pointers often lack appropriate labeling or are mislabeled, and definitive testing of individual pointers is beyond the reach of the average consumer. What we know for sure is that even the briefest exposure to high-powered blue handheld laser products can cause serious eye injuries.

Researchers reporting the results of a study in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology found that if a laser with less than five milliwatts of output power is directed at someone's eye, that person can blink or turn away without suffering an eye injury. However, the natural protective mechanisms of the eye – such as the blink reflex – are ineffective against lasers with an output power greater than five milliwatts, and severe retinal damage may occur, even after momentary exposure.

Here's what the FDA advises:
·         Never aim or shine a laser pointer at anyone.
·         Don't buy laser pointers for your children.
·         Before purchasing a laser pointer, make sure it has the following information on the label:
·         a statement that it complies with Chapter 21 CFR (the Code of Federal Regulations);
·         the manufacturer or distributor's name and the date of manufacture;
·         a warning to avoid exposure to laser radiation; and
·         the class designation, ranging from Class I to IIIa. Class IIIb and IV products should be used only by individuals with proper training and in applications where there is a legitimate need for these high-powered products.

The problem is that many laser pointers lack labels or have inaccurate labels and the researchers found that 60 percent of the sampled laser pointer products that the FDA tests are overpowered compared with what the label says. Those pointers may be powered in the 10s or 100s of milliwatts!

How do you know if your laser pointer is overpowered?
Ideally, consumers could buy a laser pointer with the certainty that it has less than five milliwatts of power, however this isn’t possible based on the poor labeling and compliance. The FDA says that if you have a laser pointer that isn't labeled or if you don't trust the labeling, consider the following:
·         If the pointer is small and runs on button batteries, its output probably is less than five milliwatts.
·         If it's pen-sized and runs on AA or AAA batteries, it's likely to be more powerful and may exceed five milliwatts.
·         If it's flashlight-sized and runs on a cluster of AA or AAA batteries or runs on lithium batteries, it likely exceeds five milliwatts.
·         Pointers sold with battery chargers probably drain their batteries quickly and are likely to be overpowered.
·         Some pointers are sold with a removable cap that spreads the beam into a pattern.  If used without the cap, the beam becomes a single beam that could exceed 5 milliwatts.
·         Look for keywords that sellers might use to indicate a pointer is highly powered without saying that it's over five milliwatts: powerful, bright, ultra, super, military, military grade, super bright, high power, ultra bright, strong, balloon pop, burn, burning, adjustable focus, lithium battery, lithium powered.
·         Look for videos or photos that show the laser burning, melting, balloon popping or show a bright, well-defined beam of light
·         Look for purchaser comments on websites that tout the brightness or power of the product.

Blue & Violet Laser Pointers Are the Most Dangerous!
Blue and Violet laser pointers are the most dangerous because the human eye actually is less sensitive to blue and violet. So, while a person would react quickly to a red or green laser, that person may not blink or turn away as fast from an equally powerful blue or violet light, creating a greater likelihood of injury.

If you or someone you know is concerned about laser pointer use and eye safety, please have them contact D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help answer questions.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Eye Injury Risk from Laser Pointers

Laser pointers are very often used in classrooms, lecture halls, during presentations and even as toys. But did you know that laser pointers can be a potential source of eye injury? Specifically, the greater a laser pointer's output power, the more likely it will cause serious eye injuries. Having a better understanding of the “do’s & don’ts’ of laser pointers as well as the potential for eye injuries as related to their strength and power, can go a long way to making that laser pointer on your desk or in your child’s hand a safe and useful tool.

Laser Pointer Output Strength
As the power increases above five milliwatts, the time margin for safe exposure decreases and permanent eye and skin damage can occur quickly. However, the output power of laser pointers is not immediately apparent to the user. Laser pointers often lack appropriate labeling or are mislabeled, and definitive testing of individual pointers is beyond the reach of the average consumer. What we know for sure is that even the briefest exposure to high-powered blue handheld laser products can cause serious eye injuries.

Researchers reporting the results of a study in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology found that if a laser with less than five milliwatts of output power is directed at someone's eye, that person can blink or turn away without suffering an eye injury. However, the natural protective mechanisms of the eye – such as the blink reflex – are ineffective against lasers with an output power greater than five milliwatts, and severe retinal damage may occur, even after momentary exposure.

Here's what the FDA advises:
·         Never aim or shine a laser pointer at anyone.
·         Don't buy laser pointers for your children.
·         Before purchasing a laser pointer, make sure it has the following information on the label:
·         a statement that it complies with Chapter 21 CFR (the Code of Federal Regulations);
·         the manufacturer or distributor's name and the date of manufacture;
·         a warning to avoid exposure to laser radiation; and
·         the class designation, ranging from Class I to IIIa. Class IIIb and IV products should be used only by individuals with proper training and in applications where there is a legitimate need for these high-powered products.

The problem is that many laser pointers lack labels or have inaccurate labels and the researchers found that 60 percent of the sampled laser pointer products that the FDA tests are overpowered compared with what the label says. Those pointers may be powered in the 10s or 100s of milliwatts!

How do you know if your laser pointer is overpowered?
Ideally, consumers could buy a laser pointer with the certainty that it has less than five milliwatts of power, however this isn’t possible based on the poor labeling and compliance. The FDA says that if you have a laser pointer that isn't labeled or if you don't trust the labeling, consider the following:
·         If the pointer is small and runs on button batteries, its output probably is less than five milliwatts.
·         If it's pen-sized and runs on AA or AAA batteries, it's likely to be more powerful and may exceed five milliwatts.
·         If it's flashlight-sized and runs on a cluster of AA or AAA batteries or runs on lithium batteries, it likely exceeds five milliwatts.
·         Pointers sold with battery chargers probably drain their batteries quickly and are likely to be overpowered.
·         Some pointers are sold with a removable cap that spreads the beam into a pattern.  If used without the cap, the beam becomes a single beam that could exceed 5 milliwatts.
·         Look for keywords that sellers might use to indicate a pointer is highly powered without saying that it's over five milliwatts: powerful, bright, ultra, super, military, military grade, super bright, high power, ultra bright, strong, balloon pop, burn, burning, adjustable focus, lithium battery, lithium powered.
·         Look for videos or photos that show the laser burning, melting, balloon popping or show a bright, well-defined beam of light
·         Look for purchaser comments on websites that tout the brightness or power of the product.

Blue & Violet Laser Pointers Are the Most Dangerous!
Blue and Violet laser pointers are the most dangerous because the human eye actually is less sensitive to blue and violet. So, while a person would react quickly to a red or green laser, that person may not blink or turn away as fast from an equally powerful blue or violet light, creating a greater likelihood of injury.

If you or someone you know is concerned about laser pointer use and eye safety, please have them contact D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help answer questions


D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Monday, March 30, 2015

Spring Eyeglass Trunk Show


D’Ambrosio Eye Care is pleased to announce their Spring Eyeglass Trunk Show providing the opportunity for eyeglass wearers to see and try on the latest spring eyewear lines and to learn about high technology eyeglass lenses from leading designers and eyeglass lens manufacturers. Guests will get great savings on selections and purchases made during the show!

Spring is a time we all like to freshen up our look and getting a new pair of eyeglasses in the latest spring fashions is a great way to do that. This season we are featuring eyeglass frames from Juicy Couture, Carrera, Liz Claiborne, Jimmy Choo, Marc by Marc Jacobs, Denim, Banana Republic & Polaroid Sunwear to name a few. The Transitions® Lenses are a really popular choice as we enter the warmer weather and people want the convenience of the color changing lenses as we spend more time outdoors. Our opticians, frame stylists and staff will be available to assist guests in eyeglass lens selection in order to select the best looking, best fitting and best performing eyeglass choices. Choosing new eyeglasses is really worthwhile at our Spring Eyewear & Eyeglass Trunk Show because anyone attending who orders eyeglasses at the trunk show will be given a 35% discount on complete eyeglasses and lenses.


The Spring Eyeglass & Eyewear Trunk Show at D’Ambrosio Eye Care will be held 479 Old Union Turnpike Lancaster, MA 01523 on Saturday April 11, 2015 from 9:00 AM until 1:00. 

Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Better Diagnosis & Treatment Reduce Glaucoma Blindness

About Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a condition where the eye does not drain fluid properly, resulting in high pressure in the eye that can damage the optic nerve. In the United States, 2.7 million people age 40 and older have the condition. If left untreated, glaucoma reduces peripheral vision and eventually may cause blindness.
 
Dr. Wu
There is good news for those with glaucoma or at risk of getting glaucoma. New advances in diagnosis and treatment are thought to lower the chance of vision loss, and in fact the risk of blindness from glaucoma has dropped by nearly half according to researchers from Mayo Clinic.
According to the Mayo Clinic study, the likelihood of losing sight in one eye was 28 percent for patients diagnosed with glaucoma between 1965 and1980. That number fell to 13.5 percent for patients diagnosed between 1981 and 2000.

At D’Ambrosio Eye Care our doctors and staff spend a great deal of time educating  patients about their risk of glaucoma and encouraging patients to have regular eye exams with glaucoma testing as this is the best way to detect glaucoma early and initiate treatment as quickly as possible. Our doctors use a combination of advanced technology for the earliest possible detection and diagnosis of glaucoma including Optical Coherence Technology (OCT) as well as high resolution digital photography for diagnostic purposes. This early diagnosis along with in office laser treatments for glaucoma has contributed to our ability to prevent vision loss and blindness from glaucoma. Despite these advances, 15 percent of those diagnosed with glaucoma still do go blind. We can’t over emphasize the importance of getting regular eye exams to detect glaucoma in the early stages so that we can prescribe vision preserving treatment as soon as possible.

If you or someone you know is concerned about glaucoma, has any risk factors for glaucoma or needs to schedule a glaucoma eye exam, please feel free to contact D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Sunday, March 15, 2015

Eye Injury Facts & Myths

Getting the facts about eye injury can possibly help you to prevent and avoid eye injuries. While there are many choices you can make to keep your eye health and vision in good shape, knowing some of the risks of eye injury and wearing proper protective eyewear make it possible to prevent 90 percent of those injuries! What is troubling is that according to a survey by the American Academy of Ophthalmology, only 35 percent of people say that they always wear protective eyewear when performing home repairs or maintenance and even less wear protective eyewear while playing sports.

Eye Injury Facts & Myths
  • Who is more likely to have an eye injury-men or women? Men!
  • Are eye injuries more common on the job or at home? Nearly half of all eye injuries occurred in the home! In fact more than 40 percent of eye injuries were caused by projects and activities such as home repairs, yard work, cleaning and cooking. More than a third of injuries in the home occurred in living areas such as the kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, living or family room.
  • More than 40 percent of eye injuries every year are related to sports or recreational activities.
  • Eyes can be damaged by sun exposure, not just chemicals, dust or objects.
  •  Among people who have had eye injuries, more than 78 percent of people were not wearing eyewear at the time of injury!

If you or someone you know is concerned about eye injury and wants to learn more about preventing eye injuries and protective eyewear, please feel free to D’Ambrosio Eye Care by calling us at 800-325-3937, visiting D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare so that we can help recommend an appropriate treatment plan.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Boston Marathon & LASIK

I was diagnosed with an eye ulcer in December 2012. After this diagnosis, I was only able to wear contacts on an extremely part-time basis (just a few hours a week). This made training for the 2013 Boston Marathon interesting as I had to wear glasses for most of my training. I felt less certain about my safety as I did not have the peripheral vision in glasses that contacts enabled me. Leading up to my LASIK, I was excited at the idea that I would not need any equipment to see. I was also nervous because my eyes are the only ones I have and what if I was the fluke and something bad happened. During the surgery, I still felt nervous. The surgery itself goes against everything that your brain thinks is normal. My second eye definitely fought it more, but it was a very quick procedure. Dr. D’Ambrosio and the staff were very calm and relaxed throughout the procedure which was comforting. Immediately after the surgery, when I sat up, I could see my mom in the waiting room. By see I mean I could see my mom clearly, not just blobs of color that I knew was her. That is something I had not been able to do in 20 years. Now, it is so nice to run and not have to deal with foggy glasses, and be able to see if I can cross the street without having to turn my whole torso.

Even with the eye ulcer, training for a marathon, and know a handful of people who have had LASIK, I was still nervous about the procedure, and a little freaked out that I would be awake for the procedure. It took me just about a year to finally decide to do it. I wish I had mentally come to terms with it sooner. Life is more enjoyable not having to worry about glasses, contacts, solution, etc. It is also nice when traveling and waking up in the middle of the night in a new place and navigating in the dark.

Michelle T.



If you or someone you know is interested in LASIK or would like to schedule a Free LASIK consultation please call us at 800-325-3937, visit D’Ambrosio Eye Care or facebook.com/dambrosioeyecare.

D'Ambrosio Eye Care provides eye care for patients throughout greater Boston, central and western Massachusetts with office locations at 479 Old Union Turnpike, Lancaster, Massachusetts 01523, 100 Powder Mill Road, Acton, Massachusetts 01720, 413 Main Street, Athol, Massachusetts 01331 and 74 Main Street, Gardner, Massachusetts 01440.